captainino:

gahdamnpunk:

Beautiful.

meh. I’m guessing this is TM. It is a violation of church and state to require students to do this at a public school. Also, while TM does have some benefits, it’s also been found that using a mantra you choose yourself/understand is more effective than the ones chosen for you in TM. IMO, it would be better to have a secular, CBT/mindfulness program in school, or at least a modified TM version where you choose your own mantra (and that is not taught by TM teachers, who vow to serve God through TM training).

“Violation of church and state” only refers to forcing religious practices on a populace.

Meditation is not a religious practice. It does not require a specific belief to partake in, and is practiced by people from all walks of life.

It is a very old mental health practice that Westerners erroneously associate with religion, because it was “packaged” with a wave of faux-Eastern enlightenment and crystal healing during the 60s and 70s. And, while it is not uncommon to see various spiritual gurus practicing meditation, it does not require any kind of belief to practice and is not exclusive to any one belief. Literally, all you have to do is sit quietly and comfortably, then focus your mind on whatever you find calming (it doesn’t have to be a religious mantra; it can just be a mental image of whatever thing you consider peaceful).

Further, meditation has been shown to increase the brain’s alpha waves, resulting in greater creativity and reducing instances of depression. And, since boredom and emotional troubles are common reasons for children’s misbehaviour? That’s a very good thing.

Likewise, yoga (also seen in the pictures) is an exercise going back thousands of years. It was originally used in the Eastern world to increase the physical health, stamina and mental discipline of soldiers. Again, it does not require a particular belief set. It is literally just a series of gentle stretches.


Also, Transcendental Meditation (which I myself do not and have never practiced) was a cult founded by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in India during the 50s, and is very loosely based on Hindu religious practices. It is not an accurate representation of meditation as a mental health practice.

The fact that you’ve misrepresented meditation in general as solely a practice of the TM cult is highly disingenuous to those who might need actual clinically-beneficial meditation.

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For those who have trouble reading text on a pic, it says:

“I’ve officially been meditating for an entire year. I cannot emphasize enough how much it’s changed my life. I went through a three year period of waking up daily with anxiety and depression. I couldn’t control my emotions and I believed every thought I had. I wasn’t able to let anything go and it made me an angry, bitter person who saw the world as an evil place full of negative people who are all out to get each other.

“But once I started meditating, over time, I began to disassociate with my ego. I began to see that we are all the infinite consciousness behind our egos and that we not only have the power to observe our thoughts, not BE our thoughts, but also laugh at those thoughts when they get ridiculous.

“Today I’m in the best place I’ve ever been in. I see the world as a much different place than I used to – the place it truly is – full of love and compassion. I spend at least 1 hour every day feeding both my mind and body – my mind through meditation and reading, and my body through running and wieghtlifting. I found purpose again.

“I want to thank Ellevan for introducing me to this life changing practice, and to Calm.com for giving me the tools every day to continue being mindful and improving my consciousness daily.

“If any of you struggle with any of the things I mentioned above, I highly encourage you to try meditation in any form you are most comfortable with. Take a class, download Calm, HeadSpace, or any of the other meditation apps in the App Store, or just try sitting silently for 10 minutes a day. I promise you, over time, your life will be changed. 🙏🏻💫🧘🏻‍♂️🧘🏽‍♀️”

For those who have trouble reading text on a pic, it says:

“I’ve officially been meditating for an entire year. I cannot emphasize enough how much it’s changed my life. I went through a three year period of waking up daily with anxiety and depression. I couldn’t control my emotions and I believed every thought I had. I wasn’t able to let anything go and it made me an angry, bitter person who saw the world as an evil place full of negative people who are all out to get each other.

“But once I started meditating, over time, I began to disassociate with my ego. I began to see that we are all the infinite consciousness behind our egos and that we not only have the power to observe our thoughts, not BE our thoughts, but also laugh at those thoughts when they get ridiculous.

“Today I’m in the best place I’ve ever been in. I see the world as a much different place than I used to – the place it truly is – full of love and compassion. I spend at least 1 hour every day feeding both my mind and body – my mind through meditation and reading, and my body through running and wieghtlifting. I found purpose again.

“I want to thank Ellevan for introducing me to this life changing practice, and to Calm.com for giving me the tools every day to continue being mindful and improving my consciousness daily.

“If any of you struggle with any of the things I mentioned above, I highly encourage you to try meditation in any form you are most comfortable with. Take a class, download Calm, HeadSpace, or any of the other meditation apps in the App Store, or just try sitting silently for 10 minutes a day. I promise you, over time, your life will be changed. 🙏🏻💫🧘🏻‍♂️🧘🏽‍♀️”

How to Meditate

(I was going to reply directly to the post, @viostormcaller, but I figured this deserves its own post.) 

A lot of people want to know how to meditate, but aren’t sure where to start. It actually doesn’t require too much effort on your part… which is something unbelievable to those of us who are used to the constant go-go-GO! of modern life.

And that goes double for people who struggle with some form of mental illness, as we never seem to have quiet or space inside our heads. But it can be done, and will help you keep focus and calm much more easily. The more you do it, the better you’ll get.


So, here’s how you can learn to meditate. Turn off your devices. Put them away. Let anyone who lives with you know that you don’t want to be disturbed for a little while.

Get comfortable, sitting or laying in your most comfortable spot in your most comfortable clothes. You can also do this at bedtime to help you sleep. Nobody’s gonna care that you’re in your pajamas and chillin’ in your bed for this.

Once you’ve found a position to sit or lay in that is the most comfortable, close your eyes. Don’t squeeze ‘em, just let them drift shut.

image

Breathe in and out slowly, counting your breaths until you feel calm. 

Once you’re calm and breathing deeply, imagine there’s a soft white light in your chest that pulses gently with every breath. This is not a strange element that randomly showed up; it’s a part of you, your spirit/soul/psyche if you want to think of it that way.

image

As you breathe slowly and deeply, picture that soft white light slowly traveling down into your left leg, loosening the muscles and taking the tension away. Let it come back up, then down into the right leg. Then up into the left shoulder and arm, then the right shoulder and arm. Let it take its time traveling along your body and let it go where it wants to go.

When it reaches your head, picture this soft light enveloping you. You’re glowing in your own inner piece of sunlight. Then, when you feel ready, picture the most relaxing place you can imagine. 

Don’t force it; let the image come to you, whether it’s a lake at sunset, a meadow in the bright midday, or (my personal favourite) an old library with mahogany shelves and old books in soft flickering candleglow.

image

This peaceful place is all yours. You can do as you see fit here to relax and let go of what is bothering you.

When you feel ready, count backwards from ten while breathing slowly, and open your eyes on “one”. 

image

Congratulations! You’ve just completed your first meditation session!

(P.S. It’s totally okay if you fall asleep the first couple of times you do it. That just shows how relaxed you were. And yes, I fell asleep my first dozen or so times too!)

How to Meditate

(I was going to reply directly to the post, @viostormcaller, but I figured this deserves its own post.) 

A lot of people want to know how to meditate, but aren’t sure where to start. It actually doesn’t require too much effort on your part… which is something unbelievable to those of us who are used to the constant go-go-GO! of modern life.

And that goes double for people who struggle with some form of mental illness, as we never seem to have quiet or space inside our heads. But it can be done, and will help you keep focus and calm much more easily. The more you do it, the better you’ll get.


So, here’s how you can learn to meditate. Turn off your devices. Put them away. Let anyone who lives with you know that you don’t want to be disturbed for a little while.

Get comfortable, sitting or laying in your most comfortable spot in your most comfortable clothes. You can also do this at bedtime to help you sleep. Nobody’s gonna care that you’re in your pajamas and chillin’ in your bed for this.

Once you’ve found a position to sit or lay in that is the most comfortable, close your eyes. Don’t squeeze ‘em, just let them drift shut.

image

Breathe in and out slowly, counting your breaths until you feel calm. 

Once you’re calm and breathing deeply, imagine there’s a soft white light in your chest that pulses gently with every breath. This is not a strange element that randomly showed up; it’s a part of you, your spirit/soul/psyche if you want to think of it that way.

image

As you breathe slowly and deeply, picture that soft white light slowly traveling down into your left leg, loosening the muscles and taking the tension away. Let it come back up, then down into the right leg. Then up into the left shoulder and arm, then the right shoulder and arm. Let it take its time traveling along your body and let it go where it wants to go.

When it reaches your head, picture this soft light enveloping you. You’re glowing in your own inner piece of sunlight. Then, when you feel ready, picture the most relaxing place you can imagine. 

Don’t force it; let the image come to you, whether it’s a lake at sunset, a meadow in the bright midday, or (my personal favourite) an old library with mahogany shelves and old books in soft flickering candleglow.

image

This peaceful place is all yours. You can do as you see fit here to relax and let go of what is bothering you.

When you feel ready, count backwards from ten while breathing slowly, and open your eyes on “one”. 

image

Congratulations! You’ve just completed your first meditation session!

(P.S. It’s totally okay if you fall asleep the first couple of times you do it. That just shows how relaxed you were. And yes, I fell asleep my first dozen or so times too!)